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  • WFP/EB.1/2001/9-A/Corr.1
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  • WFP/EB.3/98/6/3
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  • WFP/EB.2/2009/8
    1. The Director for the Southern, Eastern and Central Africa region began his overview by drawing the Board's attention to the increasing scale of food and nutrition insecurity in the region. In the Horn of Africa, drought and livestock diseases combined with the effects of global recession had led to a 14percent increase in malnourished and vulnerable populations: 20million people were in need of assistance. WFP was working to leverage various forms of assistance to address immediate needs and improve safety nets. El Niño was currently causing floods in parts of eastern Africa and drought in southern Africa, and food was only one of many urgent needs. 2. A good harvest in Zimbabwe had increased the availability of food, but there was still a cereal deficit in rural areas; WFP had been obliged by resource shortfalls to reduce its ration sizes. WFP was working with FAO to develop smallholder food production and respond to the cholera outbreak. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, political instability and conflict had displaced 2million people and left another 1.5million vulnerable to food insecurity: WFP and its partner agencies were addressing these problems as best they could. In Ethiopia, in response to earlier requests from the Board, an improved system of reporting at the district level had been introduced jointly with the Government. A new food security network and a capacity-building action plan were being developed, with a new monitoring system to be functioning by early 2010. 3. In the region as a whole, very high rates of HIV and AIDS continued to exacerbate other difficulties. WFP was preparing to introduce new and innovative tools such as cash and voucher programmes and P4P interventions to increase local procurement in support of small farmers with FAO and IFAD, and was working on forward purchasing and pre‑positioning to reduce delivery lead times, food processing projects, food exchanges and food warehousing options for small farmers, and enhancing school feeding and other safety-net approaches. The successes of the Managing Environmental Resources to Enable Transitions to More Sustainable Livelihoods (MERET) programme in Ethiopia were highlighted as a model that could be scaled up and replicated elsewhere. Throughout the region, WFP was strengthening its contacts with the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme(CAADP), the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and others. Aregional nutrition group had been formed to develop new approaches. The Regional Director expressed gratitude for the generosity of donors; the region still needed more assured funding to be able to continue its work at the current level. 4. The Ethiopia delegation gave a brief account of the Government's work to address hunger issues, noting that Ethiopia had met and even exceeded the targets set in the Maputo Declaration. Under MERET, large areas of land had been rehabilitated and reforested, and water and soil management programmes were proving to be effective. 5. Board members expressed appreciation for the Regional Director's presentation, and asked how new programme approaches were assessed in terms of suitability and cost‑efficiency. The Board commended the regional bureau on its partnerships with other United Nations agencies, NGOs and CAADP, and encouraged it to maintain and enhance them. The improvement in reporting from Ethiopia had enabled donors to increase their contributions to humanitarian work in the region. 6. The Regional Director thanked the Board on behalf of the country offices for their support. Work to improve M&E and to enhance resilience to weather shocks was ongoing and would be reported to the Board regularly. WFP's partnerships were fundamental to its operations in the region and would certainly be continued and extended. In response to a Board member's question, the Secretariat noted that new tools and nutrition products were being introduced to support the objectives of different projects; research into optimum nutrition options was ongoing. 7. In presenting the document, the Secretariat assured the Board that it incorporated responses to Board comments made at an informal consultation in July 2009. 8. The Board welcomed the new document and recognized that it addressed queries that members had raised at previous discussions. It emphasized the need for WFP to review its position and comparative advantages in Uganda, as the country's economy grew and expanded; the CP should fit within Government-led processes and focus on providing technical assistance. Some members expressed concern about the lack of support for school feeding activities, especially at the local government level. The Board commended the excellent in-country process that had gone into designing and revising this programme and the country office's strong partnerships with the Government and its ministries. 9. The Executive Director also thanked the country director for his efforts in strengthening the United Nations country team, respecting Government wishes and seeking inputs from a broader range of stakeholders. 10. Responding to points raised by the Board, the country director reported that the network of WFP sub-offices throughout Uganda was a useful resource for both WFP and UnitedNations partners working at the community level. The Government fully supported the CP, and joint action agreements were being set up with counterpart ministries outlining roles and responsibilities for reaching its objectives. Concerning school feeding, the Government regarded it as the responsibility of parents and communities, and had requested WFP to provide them with expertise and advice on how to fulfill this important responsibility. 11. The Board asked for a progress report on the CP to be presented at its Second Regular Session in 2011.
    The Board approved on a no-objection basis country programme Uganda 108070 (2009–2014) (WFP/EB.2/2009/8) for which the food requirement is 79,552 mt at a total cost to WFP of US$158.4 million and requested a progress report at the end of 2011.
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  • WFP/EB.3/98/6/1
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  • WFP/EB.2/2000/4/2
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  • WFP/EB.3/2000/6/5
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  • WFP/EB.2/2001/4/1
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  • WFP/EB.2R/97/3/Add.4
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  • WFP/EB.3/97/6/Add.1
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  • WFP/EB.A/2003/6-B/1
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  • WFP/EB.2/2006/13-B
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  • WFP/EB.A/2004/6-A/1
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  • WFP/EB.A/2017/8-A/1

    143. The Country Director recalled the broad consultative process that yielded the CSP: the first in its region, the CSP was aligned with a broad range of national and regional development policies as well as the SDGs, and reflected a joint commitment on the part of WFP and the Government to shift from emergency response to early recovery and longer-term resilience-building.

    144. The Board welcomed the CSP and commended the level of national ownership reflected in the Government’s role as WFP’s main implementing partner and in the CSP’s close alignment with national strategies and well-articulated links to the UNDAF. Members supported the overall strategy of vulnerability-based multi-sectoral programming for conflict-affected populations and the focus on the four most vulnerable regions of the country, endorsing the shift from unconditional assistance to a more targeted approach for all elements of the population with demonstrated vulnerability. One member requested clarification on how WFP planned to prioritize activities should resource constraints arise, encouraging a focus on the most vulnerable.

    145. The Board underscored that effective collaboration with a broad range of partners – in the United Nations system and beyond – would be crucial for fully realizing the CSP vision. One member urged WFP to more explicitly articulate its plans for collaborating with FAO, the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNHCR and UNICEF to devise a common approach to vulnerability targeting.

    146. One member expressed concern about WFP’s wholesale shift from treating to preventing moderate acute malnutrition, noting that no other entity in Cameroon seemed to be filling the treatment gap and suggesting collaboration with UNICEF to formulate a joint nutrition strategy and action plan leveraging both prevention and treatment.

    147. Several members noted Cameroon’s capacity-building needs and underscored the relevance of South–South cooperation, urging WFP to play a facilitating role in this regard.

    148. Thanking the Board for its support, the Country Director noted that WFP was seeking to recruit human resources in Cameroon; clarified that a joint vulnerability study had recently been completed with UNHCR to inform targeting; explained that WFP’s focus on preventing moderate acute malnutrition had been agreed with the Government and UNICEF, and assured the Board that WFP would meet its commitment to leaving no one behind, continuing to treat moderate acute malnutrition as required; highlighted the major impact of the toll-free beneficiary hotline on protecting beneficiaries; and confirmed that WFP was working with the Government to determine areas in which to pursue South–South cooperation opportunities.


    The Board approved Cameroon Country Strategic Plan (2018–2020) (WFP/EB.A/2017/8-A/1) at a total cost to WFP of USD 182.9 million.
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